Nov 14, 2020

Lutherville oral surgeon Dr. Leonard Spector receives many referrals from dentists, and he also welcomes new patients from other patients and his website.

Our office is accepting new patients. We receive referrals to our oral and maxillofacial surgery practice from many excellent dentists in various communities in and around Baltimore, including Havre de Grace and Lutherville, where our offices are located, as well as many other communities.

Patients will often call the office and say, “Can I be seen by you even though I do not have a dentist or have not been referred to your office by a dentist?” Although the majority of the patients are referred directly to our office by other referring dentists, there are many also patients who are referred to us by our loyal patients of record who have benefitted under our care. I think the highest compliment that can be afforded to me is that a patient whom I have already treated refers a friend or family member to my office. I always tell patients that their referrals are welcome and encouraged. A referral from a dentist or physician is not required for someone to call the office and make an appointment.

There are other patients who have visited our website who have sought us out for their oral surgery care. When patients are referred to us and they do not have a general dentist, we are able to refer them to a dentist for their general dental care, including exams and cleanings, thanks to our large referral base and professional relationships with excellent dentists in the area.

I have a great office team that will discuss a new patient’s needs with them over the phone before they are scheduled and take the appropriate information. Some patients only require a consultation to discuss their specific dental needs. If they need our services and we are able to provide care, we discuss treatment options with them in detail before any treatment is provided and we refer them as needed to a restorative dentist or another specialist such as an orthodontist if necessary for their overall care and well being.

Dr. Leonard Spector
www.chesapeakeimplants.dentist

Oct 3, 2020

Replacing missing teeth promptly – even those in the back of the mouth—has many benefits, because one missing tooth can affect many teeth and cause numerous problems.

When I tell patients that they need to have a back tooth replaced, they will often say, “Well, it’s a back tooth. You can’t see it. So why do I really need to have it replaced?” The answer is that each tooth in your mouth has a specific function.

The back broad molar teeth are used to grind your food. The molar teeth are designed to work with an opposing molar—the tooth in the other arch that makes contact with that tooth when you bite. So if you’re missing either an upper or a lower molar, there is no corresponding opposing tooth in the other arch. The result is that you cannot, therefore, grind your food.

Another problem is that when you are missing a tooth, the opposing tooth in the other dental arch, over time, will super-erupt into that space which may prevent you from having a dental implant because there may not be enough space to place the restoration on the implant. This problem can be corrected, but the point is that replacing a missing tooth promptly is the best course of action.

Also, if you lose a molar tooth, bone loss will tend to occur in that area, with the potential of the adjacent teeth shifting into that space where the molar used to be. This situation can lead to additional tooth and bone loss over time. Also, as you lose your back teeth, there is more pressure applied to the front teeth. Your front teeth are not designed to take these forces and the result could be tooth fracture or loss of bone around the front teeth. When teeth are subjected to too much force they also tend to shift, which alters the bite and makes it more difficult to clean around these teeth. As a result, the patient could experience problems with tooth decay and gum disease.

The bottom line is that it is not just a simple matter of losing one tooth, because when you lose one tooth, there is a cascading effect on the other teeth.

Dr. Leonard Spector
www.chesapeakeimplants.dentist

Jul 30, 2020

Dr. Leonard Spector, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, explains his extensive training and experience and offers advice to those who need oral surgery procedures.

I have been in private practice as an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for 32 years. My training involved four years of college followed by four years of dental school. I graduated second in my class from the University of Maryland Dental School in 1981.

After dental school, I completed a three-year accredited advanced dental education program in oral and maxillofacial surgery in a residency program at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C.

My training involved a very strong background in general anesthesia, placement of dental implants, orthognathic surgery, and dentoalveolar surgery. I think many patients would be surprised to know that as a dentist training to become an oral surgeon my hospital-based program included rotations in cardiology, internal medicine, as well as rotations to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit and advanced trauma training.

This great breadth of training gave me the skills necessary not only to perform procedures in my specialty but also to treat many patients who are medically compromised and referred to my office.

I started my private practice 32 years ago in the Baltimore area, specifically in the Towson, Maryland area in 1984.

One of my specific areas of interest in the practice is dental implants. My team and I do very advanced cases of dental implant surgery in our office for the convenience of the patient. This includes everything from replacing a single missing tooth with a dental implant to replacing an entire arch of teeth or even both arches with dental implants.

Another professional interest is day-to-day dentoalveolar surgery, which involves procedures such as extracting teeth when necessary, including the extraction of third molars–sometimes called “wisdom teeth”–when this procedure is indicated.

My advice to all patients who need oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures is to seek out a specialist in this highly complex field, ask about training and qualifications, and do not hesitate to ask the doctor questions before treatment begins. We are very open with our patients and we find that this approach creates trust and sets the stage for a very good experience.

Dr. Leonard Spector
www.chesapeakeimplants.dentist

Aug 5, 2020

Dr. Leonard Spector explains his extensive training and experience in anesthesia that he uses to keep patients comfortable during in-office oral surgery procedures.

I have delivered approximately 50,000 general anesthetics during my 32 years in private practice. Our private practice facility has to be certified to provide general anesthesia in our office setting. In our office, we have the most advanced equipment, including monitoring of blood pressure, EKG, pulse oximetry, and capnography, which is a way to measure carbon dioxide. My staff and I are trained in advanced cardiac life support and we regularly renew this training to stay current.

It is a great convenience for the patient to come to an oral and maxillofacial surgery office to have their procedure done. Patients understand that their surgery and anesthesia are being taken care of by individuals with an impressive amount of formal training and many years of experience. They also know that we do everything possible to make the procedures safe and we also have all the necessary equipment on site to perform procedures using different types of anesthesia, including general anesthesia if necessary.

I received extensive formal training in anesthesia during my residency program. This extensive training included a six-month rotation in the anesthesia department. I have been intensively trained in providing IV sedation and general anesthesia.

We closely screen all of our patients prior to anesthesia, and we have an excellent safety record for providing anesthesia in our office. In regard to the monitoring, we are using all the most advanced, state of the art monitoring equipment to provide the safest type of general anesthetic that can be provided in an office setting.

The drugs we use are all ultra short-acting drugs, and many of these drugs have a reversal agent. With our advanced training, we are able to provide a level of anesthesia in which the patients are extremely comfortable and sedated during the procedure, but also recover very quickly following the procedure.

Dr. Leonard Spector
www.chesapeakeimplants.dentist

Aug 5, 2020

Orthodontic treatment often involves close cooperation with an oral surgeon to expose impacted canines and remove other teeth to create proper space.

The canine teeth, also called eye teeth, are longer and pointier than other teeth. A common procedure is to expose and place a bracket on impacted canine teeth when these teeth are impacted. As an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, I perform this procedure when it is requested by an orthodontist. Once there are brackets placed on these teeth, the orthodontist can guide the teeth into position as part of overall orthodontic treatment.

Orthodontists also like to refer to our office because we have advanced cone beam technology, which means three-dimensional imaging technology. We are able to evaluate the position of the teeth in relation to other teeth and roots in the mouth so we can safely and very efficiently expose these teeth knowing exactly where they are located in the anatomy of the jaws.

Other common things we do in concert with orthodontists is to remove teeth in patients where there is dental crowding and teeth have to be removed in order for the orthodontist to straighten and place all the teeth correctly and functionally in the mouth.

Many times the teeth are just too large to be accommodated in the space that nature provides. For example, wisdom teeth can sometimes block the second molars from erupting. Once the wisdom teeth are removed, then there is space for the second molars to come in.

Removing wisdom teeth solves problems and no one misses having them. Even when wisdom teeth come in properly, we usually do not chew that far back in our mouth and so wisdom teeth are not functional.

Additionally, in younger patients, we are often asked by the orthodontist to remove some of the primary teeth to accelerate the eruption of the permanent teeth.

The key to proper treatment is close collaboration between the orthodontist and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

Dr. Leonard Spector
www.chesapeakeimplants.dentist