Lutherville Oral Surgeon | Oral Cancer Risk Factors

Oral Surgeon in Lutherville

Dental Implants in 21093During a comprehensive dental examination, our team will look for signs of oral cancer. Early detection is key with oral cancer. If caught early, most forms of oral cancer are treatable. Our dental team is trained and educated to identify oral cancer.

Everyone is susceptible to the disease, but some groups of people are at a higher risk level than others. Here are the top seven risk factors for oral cancer.

Age

Are you in your mid 40s? Your risk of developing oral cancer increases with age. A noticeable increase is evident in people in their 40s and older. According to the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, the majority of diagnosed cases occur around the age of 62, but the average age is declining. The recent increase in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) related cases is causing more people to be diagnosed for oral cancers between the ages of 52 and 56. As the average age for oral cancer cases decreases, it is vital that you receive regular oral cancer screenings at any age.

Gender

Men are twice as likely to develop oral cancer compared to women. Part of this difference may be related to regular intake of alcohol and tobacco. According to the American Cancer Society, the gender difference is decreasing since more women are drinking and using tobacco today than in previous generations. There has also been a trend in recent years of younger men being diagnosed with HPV-related oral cancer. Both men and women should schedule regular oral health examinations to detect oral cancer early.

Tobacco

Smoking or chewing tobacco can greatly increase your risk of developing oral cancer. Tobacco can lead to cancer of the mouth or throat. Additionally, oral tobacco products cause cancers associated with the cheeks, gums, and inner surface of the lips. Development of these cancers depend on the duration and frequency of tobacco use. Non-smokers are not immune to oral cancer, so be sure to schedule an appointment with our team for an examination.

Alcohol

Among those that are diagnosed with oral cancer, about 70% of people are characterized as heavy drinkers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heavy drinking is defined as having an average of two or more drinks per day for men, and one or more drinks per day for women. People who drink heavily can be more than twice as likely to develop oral cancers than people who do not drink. Oral cancer can still occur in people who have never had an alcoholic drink. Contact our team to schedule an examination.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

This sexually transmitted disease is associated with at least 10,000 cases of oral cancer diagnosed each year in the United States. People who have HPV-related oral cancers tend to be younger and are unlikely to smoke or drink. Typically, those diagnosed with HPV-related oral cancers are at a much lower risk of death or reoccurrence. We suggest a proactive approach by maintaining regular visits to our dental office.

Sunlight

People who work outside or with prolonged exposure to sunlight have a higher risk of developing lip cancer. It is vital to use UV protection when under the sun. Many lip balms offer UV protection. If you work outdoors frequently, schedule an additional examination with our team.

Diet

Poor nutrition can increase your risk for developing oral cancer. According to the American Dental Association, reports have shown that a link exists between diets low in fruits and vegetables and a higher risk for oral cancers. However, oral cancer can develop in healthy individuals. No matter your diet, schedule a visit with our team for a comprehensive oral examination.

Oral cancer does not discriminate. While these seven factors have been tied to an increased risk of oral cancer, that does not diminish the importance of regular oral examinations for everyone regardless of their age, gender, or other factors. Regular dental examinations make it possible for our team to detect oral cancer early. Contact our dentist to schedule a comprehensive oral examination.  

Leonard Spector, D.D.S.
Chesapeake Oral Surgery & Dental Implants

2360 W. Joppa Road, Suite 310, Lutherville MD 21093Dental Implants in 21093

Havre de Grace Oral Surgeon | What You Should Know About Partial Dentures

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Determining Which Type of Denture is Best for You  

Dentures can either be a replacement of all of one’s teeth known as complete dentures or a section of teeth, known as partial dentures. When arriving for your scheduled appointment here is what you can expect. X-rays to look for any issues that might affect fit. In some cases, the addition of crowns, may be needed to accommodate the new partials. Once fitted, your dentist will recommend keeping them in for one week to make any necessary adjustments. Next, how you should care for them, why it is important to note any misconceptions, and any future questions you might have will go down here in this handy guide. Always consult your dental professional should you have any questions or concerns.

Fitting of Partial Dentures

Having been fitted with your partials, you will be ready to schedule a follow up appointment you’re your dental professional to make any adjustments and address any concerns you are having during this first week period. There will be different types of products available to you the consumer for taking care of your new partials, and that it is important to know what to expect when wearing and caring for them. Some of the commonly held misconceptions are listed below and are summarized from the ADA’s recommendations. 

Misconceptions and how to Care for Them Below, is a look at some differences, and what you can expect when caring for your new partials. The many different types of products available to you over the counter and caring for them will change. Below, we can see how and what will be done different.    

  1. Never brush your dentures with a regular toothbrush. Always use an approved denture brush designed specifically for dentures themselves, otherwise you can damage them.
  2. Avoid any non-approved denture toothpaste not designed for dentures. They are far too abrasive and again you risk damaging them.
  3. Instead, using a mild household soap and water is perfectly acceptable and will not damage them.  
  4. Your dentist will probably recommend a cleanser. Look for denture cleaners sold over the counter that are ADA acceptable and the label clearly indicates this.  
  5. Finally, if at any time your dentures become damaged, either they have been chipped or are missing one or more teeth, consult your dentist immediately.

Whether you are deciding which type of dentures, either partial and full replacements, you should now have a basic understanding of what to expect with full or partial ones. Avoiding cleansers and brushes that will cause harm or damage and following the recommendation of your dental professional are crucial in making your new partials last a long time. For helpful links, see the resources below and follow the links and to schedule your appointment, please contact our office below. 

2027 Pulaski Highway, Suite 113

Havre de Grace, MD 21078

Phone:(410) 670-4500

Lutherville Oral Surgeon | Dentistry – Past, Present, and Future

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“Tooth worms” are the cause of tooth decay. That was the headline of a Sumerian text from around 5,000 B.C.E. Fortunately, the dental industry has evolved since then and we know “tooth worms” don’t exist. Here’s how dentistry has evolved into the comfortable, safe, and beneficial science of today.

In the Beginning

Did you know that the ancient Egyptians had designated doctors for teeth? Evidence has been uncovered suggesting the Chinese used acupuncture to treat pain associated with tooth decay as early as 2700 B.C.E.

Additionally, in 500 B.C.E., Hippocrates and Aristotle wrote of treating teeth and oral diseases by using sterilization procedures and red-hot wires. They also spoke of using these red-hot wires to stabilize jaw fractures and bind loose teeth.

The Visionary Thoughts of the 1600s-1700s

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, the 1600s and 1700s were a gold mine of innovation in the dental world. In 1695, Charles Allen published the first ever English dental textbook entitled The Operator of Teeth. In the book, he advises using a homemade toothpaste from powdered coal, rose-water, and “dragon’s blood” to keep teeth clean and white. Allen also suggests using dog’s teeth for transplants and even references wisdom teeth in his book.

In the 18th century, Pierre Fauchard was well ahead of his time in the medical practice when his master work The Surgeon Dentist was published. For the first time, dentistry was described as a modern profession. Some notable highlights in the book include sugar being the cause of dental caries (cavities), braces being used to correct teeth position, and the concept of a dentist’s chair light.

The Progressive 1800s

The discoveries and inventions of the 1800s were significant. In 1816, Auguste Taveau developed the first form of dental fillings made out of silver coins and mercury. In 1840, Horace Wells demonstrated the use of nitrous oxide to sedate patients and Thomas Morton employed the use of ether anesthesia for surgery.

That same year, Horace Hayden and Chapin Harris boosted modern dentistry by opening the first dental school, inventing the modern doctorate of dental surgery, and starting the first dental society. By the end of the 1800’s, porcelain inlays, the first mechanized dental drill, and the toothpaste tube had all been invented.

Scientific Advancement of the 1900s

The scientific development of the 1900s gave birth to some amazing advancements in the dental industry. Electric drills became available due to the invention of electricity. In 1907, precision case fillings made by a “lost wax” casting machine was invented to fill cavities, and Novocain was introduced into US dental offices.

In 1955, Michael Buonocore described the method of tooth bonding to repair cracked enamel on teeth. Years later, the first fully-reclining dental chair is introduced to put patients and dentists at ease.  By the 1990s, “invisible” braces were introduced, along with the first at-home tooth bleaching system.

What Will the Future of Dentistry Hold?

Today, dental professionals are investigating the links between oral health and overall health. The use of gene-mediated therapeutics to alter the genetic structure of teeth to increase resistance to tooth decay is receiving attention. Some researchers believe that there may be a way to grow a new tooth structure around weakened enamel. Only time will tell what the future of dentistry will bring, but our office is dedicated to seeking the most effective modern technologies as they arise.

Schedule your visit to our office and experience what modern dentistry can do for you.

2360 W. Joppa Road, Suite 310

Lutherville MD 21093

Phone: (410) 670-4500

Lutherville Oral Surgeon | 6 Ways to Get Your Calcium

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Calcium is an important mineral for building strong, healthy teeth. Not everyone can tolerate the lactose found in dairy, which is often a prime source for calcium. There are a wide variety of options available to get the calcium you need. Here are six options rich in calcium:

Canned Seafood

Canned seafood, such as sardines and salmon, can be an excellent source of calcium. These inexpensive options contain more calcium than their fresh counterparts. Canned seafood has small, soft, edible bones that are generally unnoticeable but can be a great way to add calcium to a salad or another dish.

Alternative Milk Products

Soy, rice, and almond milks offer added calcium and can be used as a milk substitute in many dishes. Experiment with different varieties to determine which flavor you like the most for each use. Try one of these milk alternatives on cereal or use in a cooked dish. Soy, rice, and almond milks are available in a variety of flavors, including plain, sweetened, unsweetened, vanilla, and other options.

Green Vegetables

Green vegetables are a prime source of calcium. Collard greens, mustard, turnip, and dandelion greens, Chinese cabbage, spinach, kale, okra, and broccoli are all great choices for adding calcium to your diet.

Milk

Milk is one of the best sources of calcium. One cup of cow’s milk can potentially contain a quarter of the recommended daily intake of calcium. Cow’s milk is also a cheap option, as it is generally priced below alternative options like almond milk. Additional benefits provided are good source of protein, vitamin A and vitamin D.

Yogurt

Most yogurts are high in calcium. The highest source of calcium from yogurt comes from the low-fat variety, while Greek yogurt has a lower amount of calcium than regular yogurt.

Cheese

A lot of cheeses are excellent sources of calcium. Parmesan cheese has the highest amount of calcium among cheeses. Softer varieties of cheese generally have less calcium than others. Aged and hard cheeses typically contain less lactose, making them easier to eat for people with dairy restrictions.

Calcium is important for developing and maintaining strong teeth and bones. If you have trouble digesting dairy, don’t let that stop you from consuming your recommended amount of daily calcium.

Contact our office to schedule your visit today.

Chesapeake Oral Surgery & Dental Implants
2360 W. Joppa Rd., Suite 310, Lutherville, MD 21093
(410) 670-4500

Oral Surgeon Lutherville | Biting Off More than You Can Chew?

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It is not uncommon for many of us to grab a bite to eat in a hurry. Americans have grown accustomed to bigger food portions at restaurants, but our mouths have not. Trying to fit that oversized sandwich or apple in your mouth might be worse for you than you have ever imagined. Below are some reasons why this could be detrimental for your oral health and what you can do about it.

Why This Is a Problem

According to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), taking bites that are too big for you to chew can not only cause jaw and teeth issues, it can also cause digestive problems. Discomfort, swelling and difficulty eating may result from opening your jaw too wide. Taking large bites may also result in food not being chewed thoroughly, which can lead to weight gain and digestive issues.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD)

Constantly opening your jaw too wide becomes an even larger problem for people with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The temporomandibular joint connects the jaw to the skull bones enabling movement during chewing. People with TMD, usually have a restriction with how wide they can open their jaws. Taking large bites of food, especially hard foods like apples, can aggravate this condition making pain and jaw clicking worse.

What You Can Do

If you have food that is too large to chew or starts to cause jaw discomfort, try cutting your food into smaller portions. This makes food easier to eat with less hassle. Also consider eating softer foods that won’t harm your teeth or irritate your jaw.

Tip: Avoid chewing on ice, popcorn kernels, hard candies, and opening nuts with your teeth. This can lead to a chipped tooth!

Contact our team today to schedule an exam and cleaning.

Chesapeake Oral Surgery & Dental Implants
2360 W. Joppa Rd., Suite 310, Lutherville, MD 21093
(410) 670-4500

Oral Surgeon Near Me | Eating While Healing

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Our experienced oral surgeon provides excellent results and works to minimize the time required for your mouth to heal following surgery. However, any oral surgery will require you to take extra care of your mouth for at least a few days afterward. If you are preparing for oral surgery, it can be helpful to consider what kinds of foods to avoid and those you may want to have available during this period.

Foods that are hot, cold, spicy, or acidic can be painful for soft tissues during the healing process. Your mouth will be sensitive for the first few days. Foods that require a lot of chewing can cause bleeding, slower healing or even infection. Hard foods like chips can splinter in the mouth and cut into delicate gums. Drinking through a straw adds strain on your tissues and can be harmful. All these should be avoided during the first day or two, at least.

During your initial 24 hours, you will want to take extra care with what and how you eat. Stick with soft and mushy foods that do not require much work to chew. Here are some ideas to consider:

  • Banana smoothies – while you should avoid straws, banana smoothies are tasty, filling, and contain valuable nutrition.
  • Soft fruits – applesauce, mandarin orange slices in juice, and seedless watermelon are all easy to eat and taste great.
  • Soups – warm (not hot) broths and soups help you maintain your strength as you heal. Select soups that do not have chunks that will need to be chewed.
  • Mashed potatoes – soft, warm, and filling, mashed potatoes can help you feel as though you’ve eaten a meal. Try adding some shredded cheese for a jazzier dish.
  • Puddings and gelatin – though you want to be careful of your sugar intake, puddings and flavored gelatin are a great way to get some needed calories, especially if you are experiencing soreness or stiffness during the initial hours after your surgery. Both are gentle on the stomach, as well as the mouth, making them a useful option.

For more suggestions on post-surgery care and eating, contact our office.

Chesapeake Oral Surgery & Dental Implants
2360 W. Joppa Rd., Suite 310, Lutherville, MD 21093
(410) 670-4500

Chesapeake Oral Surgeon | Blood Thinners and Oral Surgery

Blood thinning medications are helpful in regulating your body to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other serious issues. However, if you are scheduled for oral surgery, it is vital that our oral surgeon is aware of all medications you are using.

How Blood Thinners Work

There are two types of blood thinners. The first type works to prevent blood clotting. Medications ranging from aspirin to Plavix fit into this category. The other type of blood thinners work to prevent blood from coagulating; Coumadin or warfarin accomplish this.

What Our Oral Surgeon Should Know

When you have your oral surgery consultation appointment, be sure to share with us any medications you are taking. We need to have your complete medical history to ensure your safety and proper treatment. Our dentist might also ask you the purpose of each medication you are taking to better understand any side-effects or other medical issues that could affect your oral surgery.

Steps to Take Before Surgery

Never stop any medication without consulting your doctor. Depending on your medical history, your doctor might suggest specific blood tests before having oral surgery. Communication is key, both between you and your primary physician, and between you and our office. If your treatment requires additional medication to be taken, ask about potential drug interactions.

Steps to Take to Minimize Oral Bleeding

Bleeding resulting from oral surgery can occur, but each patient will have different results. The most effective way to minimize oral bleeding is to firmly apply pressure to the area for up to 30 minutes. Gauze is recommended for applying gentle pressure to stop bleeding. Depending on the oral surgery procedure, we may ask you to refrain from drinking hot liquids and rinsing your mouth for the first day. We suggest avoiding rough or sharp foods that might cut your mouth.

Prior to having any oral surgery, it is important that our experienced surgical team has a thorough knowledge of your medical history. This enables us to find the best possible solutions for your needs, while ensuring your safety.

If you have any questions about medications and oral surgery, contact our office.

Chesapeake Oral Surgery & Dental Implants
2360 W. Joppa Rd., Suite 310
Lutherville, MD 21093
(410) 670-4500

Lutherville Implant Dentist | Don’t Miss Your Screening

Oral cancer does not discriminate. It affects those of all ages, genders and races. Smokers do develop oral cancers at higher rates than non-smokers. However, this does not absolve the rest of the population from being at risk, as well.

It’s incredibly important to keep to your recommended schedule of oral health examinations. By visiting your general dentist at least twice per year, it is much more likely that our dental team will be able to identify potentially cancerous lesions in early stages. As you may know, the key to survival of most forms of cancer is early detection. Oral cancers are treatable, especially if caught before displaying obvious signs. The best results occur when oral cancer is identified and treated during early stages.

If your general dentist identifies a lesion that appears to be irregular, he or she may refer you to our team. We’ll recommend the next steps. Once pathology has been identified, we can proceed with treatment if necessary.

We will complete a biopsy to confirm whether a lesion is cancerous. It is not possible to confirm an oral cancer diagnosis without a biopsy. For this reason, try to refrain from making assumptions until we have confirmed your diagnosis. If it’s been more than 6 months since your last appointment or if you have noticed a lesion, bump or irregular patch of skin that doesn’t heal within a few days, consider an oral cancer screening by your general dentist. Know that your dentist will provide you with advice and may refer you to our team for a closer look.

If you have considered skipping the recommended dental visits that provide your first line of defense against oral cancers, please reconsider. It could save your life.

Oral Surgeon Near Me | It’s Like Pulling Teeth: Oral Surgeon Redefines Popular Phrase

There are many phrases used in day-to-day life that insinuate that dentistry is uncomfortable. Perhaps you’ve heard the old expression: “[blank]…is like pulling teeth.” We’d like to point out that the meaning of this phrase should change in response to the comfortable experience we provide our patients.

Our team is trained to handle both simple and complex extractions. With the use of modern technology, we’re able to extract even the most severely impacted teeth with ease. You’ll find the experience to be efficient and hassle-free. After an extraction with our team you’ll find yourself thinking about making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, taking a nap, or enjoying a quiet evening at home to be on par with a “pulling teeth” experience.

After your treatment is complete, you’ll be provided step-by-step care instructions and encouraged to call with any questions or concerns. We’re here for you, and we prioritize your comfort, along with your health and safety. We look forward to redefining your expectations in tooth extraction. Contact us to learn more or to schedule a consultation with our team.

Lutherville, MD Oral Surgeon | Brushing After Every Meal: Good or Bad

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oral surgeon luthervilleHave you ever been told you should brush your teeth after every meal? Do you practice this habit?

While this sounds good, in fact this practice could be detrimental to the health of your teeth, depending on what you have eaten or drank. Enamel is the guardian of your teeth and the hardest material in the body. It’s the first defense against harmful bacteria and degradation of enamel will cause will lead to dental caries – otherwise known as cavities.

When you eat, for around twenty minutes, certain foods help create bacteria which attacks your tooth enamel. Carbohydrates and sugary foods are an ideal example. Brushing after eating will remove the bacteria preventing them from attacking. This sounds like a great idea then, right?

Now here’s the catch

When eating or drinking the pH balance in our mouths changes. After each bite of acidic food, the balance moves towards a level which causes demineralization. The new acidity softens the enamel which can cause bacteria to get into the teeth. Brushing right after, because of the acidity, may damage your enamel – making this whole process much worse.

Don’t worry, there are steps you can take to help your oral health!

If you’ve had anything acidic, don’t brush for at least 30 minutes. Fruits with citric acid are one example.

If you are planning ingesting acidic foods or drinks, you can brush beforehand.

A glass of water will help remove the acid. Follow this by chewing sugarless gum. These steps help create saliva which will help bring back the necessary pH balance needed for a healthy smile.

Try to avoid soda as prolonged phosphoric acid can cause permanent damage to your enamel via erosion. While this can be an extremely difficult task for some your teeth will thank you for years to come.

If you’re concerned about what constitutes acidic foods and how they affect your enamel, please contact our office.